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30575 Approach Dr, Abbotsford, BC V2T 6H5, Canada

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What you will Achieve from this Program

When you complete this program, you will obtain a Group 1 (Multi-engine) Instrument Rating issued by Transport Canada, attached to either your Private Pilot Licence, or your Commercial Pilot Licence.  You will be also be issued a Certificate of Qualification—Instrument Rating by Coastal Pacific Aviation. 

The holder of a Group 1 (Multi-engine) Instrument Rating may exercise the privileges of Pilot-in-command of singe-engine and multi-engine aircraft when there is no visual reference to the ground.  When combined with a Commercial Pilot Licenc, the licencing requirements established by Transport Canada to hold an Airline Transport Pilot Licence are met in accordance with CAR 421.34(4).

Overview of Pilot Training

Ideally, student complete their Instrument Rating and Multi-engine Class Rating concurrently—if these are done at the same time, students transfer their highest possible flying skills from their Multi-engine Flight Ttest directly to their IFR Flight Test.  Here is how this “ideal training” is conducted:  Students begin in the simulator with their Instrument Rating training, building up their Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) skills pertaining to airport departure, enroute, hold, and approach skills.  This simulator portion lasts about 10 hours (for those to enter the program with the 20 hours of instrument training associated with Commercial Pilot Licence training completed), and the training is conducted in multi-engine simulated aircraft—students therefore simultaneously introduce to the management multi-engine aircraft, including takeoffs, approaches and landings, and engine-failure drills early in their training.  Once you have completed the approximate 10 hours of simulator training, you transition to the Twin Comanche to focus on Multi-engine Class Rating exercises in preparation for the Multi-engine Class Rating Flight Test—this should take approximately 7 hours.  Having completed this flight test, your multi-engine skills are at their best—you then stay in the Twin Comanche to prepare for you Instrument Rating Flight Test and complete your cross-country IFR training requirements.

This is the ideal training sequence, but it by no means applies to all students entering the Instrument Rating Program—some may already have previous IFR or multi-engine experience.  In such cases, we will customize your training to suit your needs.

 

Multi-engine Rating Student must only complete flight test conducted in an aircraft with a Pilot Examiner.  There is no written examination requirement.  

Requirements for Entrance (Prerequisites) and Completion

Students entering the Instrument Rating Program must hold a valid Commercial Pilot Licence or Private Pilot Licence, and must hold a valid Category 1 or Category 3 Medical Certificate. In accourdance with the requirements established by the Private Career Training Institutions Agency, entrance into this program requires the completion of Grade 12(or equivalent) or candidates must qualify as a mature student (age 19 and not having attended school full-time for 52 weeks).

Special consideration must be given to the requirement that students require 50 hours of cross-country experience to qualify for an Instrument Rating; students entering the program should therefore ensure that they are within striking distance of this requirement so that it can be completed prior to Instrument Rating qualification.

Transport Canada's Minimum Requirements for Completion

Knowledge Requirements—Ground School Instruction

Not applicable.

Knowledge Requirements—Written Examination

An applicant shall have obtained a minimum of 70% on the written examination Instrument Rating (INRAT) which musht include the following subjects:

  1. Canadian Aviation Regulations;

  2. Instrument Flight Rules and Procedures;

  3. Meteorology;

  4. Instruments;

  5. Radio and Radar systems; and

  6. Navigation.

 

Experience Requirements

An applicant shall have completed a minimum of:

  1. 50 hours of cross-country flight as pilot-in-command in aeroplanes or helicopters of which 10 hours must be in the appropriate category; and

  2. 40 hours of instrument time of which a maximum of 20 hours may be instrument ground time. The 40 hours instrument time shall include a minimum of:

    1. 5 hours of dual instrument flight time acquired from the holder of a flight instructor rating ,

    2. 5 hours in aeroplanes where the applicant is applying for a Group 1, 2 or 3 instrument rating or in helicopters where the applicant is applying for a Group 4 instrument rating,

    3. Fifteen (15) hours of dual instrument flight time provided by a qualified person as specified in CAR 425.21(9); and

    4. A dual cross-country flight under simulated or actual IMC conditions of a minimum of 100 nautical miles, the flight to be conducted in accordance with an IFR flight plan to include at, two different locations, an instrument approach to minima.

 

Skill Requirements

An applicant for a Instrument Rating shall successfully complete a flight test in accordance with the Instrument Rating Flight Test Guide.

Estimated Training Costs 

The following are the minimum estimated cost for students based on Transport Canada's minimum requirements and apply to Commercial Pilot Licence students who have completed the 20-hour instrument training requirements of the Commercial Pilot  Licence training.  Also, please keep in mind that the above pricing is subject to change without notice—this permits the school to respond timely to significant fluctuations in aviation fuel costs.  Importantly, Coastal Pacific Aviation does not charge students with a fuel surcharge—a practice common with flight schools whereby the added cost of fuel is not published on websites under training costs.

Important Considerations for the estimated costs of Pilot Training

It is important to note that the training costs for pilot training is difficult to predict owing to the fact that the training frequency among student vary, as does the skill level of students with regard to both flight training and written examination preparation. 

 

If a student has difficulty in preparing for written examination, the effect of this is likely to be simply delayed completion—delayed completion does add to expenses—food and housing while being a student, for example—but this is much less than the costs of having to add more practice flights to the air training. 

 

The more significant cost variable therefore pertains to the flying skill levels of students—students must meet the flying standards of Canadian Instrument Rating as established by Transport Canada, and as outlined in the Instrument Rating Flight Test Guide.

 

Be aware that Flight Instructors are required by Transport Canada not to recommend students for flight tests unless they have a reasonable expectation the student will be successful—if a Flight Instructor’s passing rate for flight tests does not meet published standards (CAR 421.67[2]), Flight Instructors—as well as the flight school—are subject to Transport Canada review and penalties. 

 

While training costs overruns are less likely with Instrument Rating Students when compared with students enrolled in the Private Pilot Program (Instrument Rating students already know how to fly when they start the program), cost overruns are still a risk, especially when a student experiences delays in completing the written examination requirements of the training. 

 

What is the best way to deal with this risk?  In the case of Private Pilot Students, we recommend that they retain an additional $5,000 in reserve for financial planning purposes should a cost overrun be encountered.  Just to be on the cautious side, we recommend Instrument Rating Students retain $3,000 in reserve.  We also point out that—in all cases—training costs can be substantially reduced in conjunction with regular flying and effective student self-study and preparation for flights.

Important Considerations for International Students

For International Students, our admissions process requires that you send a non-refundable $500 administrative fee, payable to Coastal Pacific Aviation, which will be used to fund administrative and courier costs, including the preparation and issue of the Letter of Acceptance.  You will use Letter of Acceptance when you begin your application for a Study Permit and Visa.  All payments made by International students must be made by Wire Transfer—please contact Jing (Ashley) He, Coastal Pacific Aviation’s Accounting Officer via email to obtain detailed information on how to pay with Wired Transfer.  For all sorts of additional information importance to International Students, please see the International Students’ Page of this website.

Group 1 (Multi-engine) Instrument Rating Program